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Caregivers and Family

Keeping a Loved One Safe from COVID-19

Caregiving can be a challenge when times are "normal." Adding in a pandemic and caregiving takes on another level of challenge, but Russel Brand and his father found ways to make it easier.

How caregivers can protect someone with cancer from COVID-19

People at average risk can take responsibility on behalf of a loved one with cancer by helping to limit their exposure to others. Wear a mask, social distance and plan to get a vaccine for the sake of your loved one. Go to the store or pharmacy to help that at-risk person avoid unnecessary trips out.

Breast Cancer Genetic Testing

One in 8 American women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime. Among all cases, about 10 percent are caused by the inherited genetic alterations BRCA1 and BRCA2. But many at-risk women don’t know they’re predisposed.

Why Every Pancreatic Cancer Patient Should Consider Genetic Testing

It now appears that as many as 1 in 10 patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer carry a genetic alteration associated with an increased risk of pancreatic or other cancer types. If family members learn they may be at risk for pancreatic or other cancer types, they have more opportunities to take action.

Talking to Children About Cancer

Cancer can be an uncertain time for families, but one thing that’s clear is communication with children is essential when a parent or loved one is ill. Families Facing Cancer is a program that provides parents with information on how to talk to children of all ages about a cancer diagnosis.

Prostate Cancer and Hereditary Risk

Many of us are now aware that women with certain hereditary genetic mutations have an increased risk of breast cancer. What you might not know, though, is that some of those same genetic mutations -- and a handful of others -- are linked to aggressive prostate cancer in men.

BRCA Gene Mutations and Cancer

Two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, if mutated are known to dramatically increase a woman’s risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Men can also carry these genes, and if they have a gene mutation, which also puts them at risk for developing breast and other cancers, though their breast cancer risk is not nearly as much as in women. Here's what you need to know about these genes and genetic testing.

After the Death of a Spouse

After losing a spouse, it’s normal to feel alienated and alone. A social worker, writer and cancer widow offers her tips for healing. Kristin Meehof, a cancer widow, offers 7 ways to maintain your sanity and begin the healing process.

A Cancer Widow's Story

Whether you are facing a medical crisis or someone you know and love just heard life-changing news, chances are you’re in a place -- both literally and figuratively -- that you never imagined. When the worst occurs, perspective can be everything. How shifting their focus after a cancer diagnosis helped one couple cope.

Genetic Risk Factors for Skin Cancer

Many factors can increase the risk of developing melanoma and other skin cancers. Some of these factors are due to behaviors, like exposure to the sun. However, some risk factors for skin cancers are inherited in families.

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