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News Archive

Date: 07/13/2017
Following a cancer diagnosis, all patients experience some level of distress -- regardless of disease stage. When severe and left untreated, distress can have a significant impact on health outcomes, lead to greater mortality and morbidity, affect immune function, and result in higher health care expenditures.
Date: 07/12/2017
The University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center Research Committee recently awarded $340,000 in grants to faculty for cancer-related research.
Date: 07/12/2017
Researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center received more than $23 million in grants in June and July, 2017.
Date: 06/30/2017
New research out of the University of Michigan supports combining two approaches to fight back against gliomas: attacking the tumor with gene therapy while enhancing the immune system’s ability to fight it, too.
Date: 06/29/2017
In a new study, researchers used a patient's own cancer history rather than family history to identify genetic mutations that might influence cancer treatment and risk for family members.
Date: 06/27/2017
Researchers at the University of Michigan will lead one of five nationally funded centers dedicated to accelerating research into understanding the molecular basis of cancer and sharing resources with the scientific community.
Date: 06/23/2017
As thyroid cancer rates rise, more people are having surgery to remove all or part of their thyroid. A new study suggests complications from these procedures are more common than previously believed.
Date: 06/21/2017
About 39,300 cancer professionals from around the world met June 2-6 in Chicago for the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting.
Date: 06/12/2017
Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center found an innovative approach to improve control of locally advanced lung cancer tumors while preserving more normal tissue. It involves a midtreatment PET-CT scan using the radioactive tracer fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and then individualizing escalated radiation to the target region the tracer identifies.
Date: 06/12/2017
An investigation from the University of Michigan could eventually lead to new therapies that take aim at the most aggressive type of breast cancer -- triple-negative.

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